floeme:

Realm of the Night
Another beautiful day in Seattle

Another beautiful day in Seattle

yourlovewillbesafe-withme:

nevver:

Best Coast, Amy Ruppel

best coast indeed

sci-universe:

Beautiful view of a streaking meteor and the Orion constellation above Lake Bumbunga, AustraliaImage copyright: Silveryway on Flickr

sci-universe:

Beautiful view of a streaking meteor and the Orion constellation above Lake Bumbunga, Australia
Image copyright:
Silveryway on Flickr

bluepueblo:

Approaching Storm, Barley Field, Germany
photo via indie

bluepueblo:

Approaching Storm, Barley Field, Germany

photo via indie

betweenthewoodsandthewater:

big ears by rastorejko http://ift.tt/1zCotNz
nicolasbruno:

It has been said that there are passageways and tunnels at the bottoms of wells such as this one… Piazza Giordano Bruno; Perugia, Italy.

nicolasbruno:

It has been said that there are passageways and tunnels at the bottoms of wells such as this one…
Piazza Giordano Bruno; Perugia, Italy.

arcanja:

Hotel lobby! by xTorfinnx on Flickr.

mypubliclands:

Trivia Tuesday from BLM Montana

Pompeys Pillar National Monument is home to Captain William Clark’s signature carved into a sand stone butte along the Yellowstone River in 1806. Clark’s inscription is still the only remaining physical evidence along the route of the Lewis and Clark Expedition. - My Public Lands Magazine

During his return trip to St. Louis, William Clark of the Lewis and Clark Expedition climbed the Pillar and carved his signature and the date in the sandstone. Clark wrote, “This rock I ascended and from its top had a most extensive view in every direction on the Northerly Side of the river high romantic Cliffs approach & jut over the water for Some distance both above and below…I marked my name and the day of the month and year.”

While archaeological digs and other recent research have uncovered artifacts that may have been left by the Corps of Discovery, Clark’s inscription is still the only remaining physical evidence of Lewis and Clark’s passing visible on their actual route. This historic carving on the sandstone butte that Clark called a “remarkable rock” has inspired generations of visitors for more than 100 years.

Pompeys Pillar National Monument in Montana, a part of the BLM’s National Conservation Lands, was proclaimed a national monument in January 2001. Prior to its monument status, it was a designated national historic landmark in 1965. It is located along the Lewis and Clark National Historic Trail. Learn more: http://on.doi.gov/18XoTnK

Photos by Bob Wick, BLM

rhamphotheca:

Flying Squirrels Style They Swoops
by Emily Underwood
Flying squirrels look reckless as they fling themselves through the air, but there’s finesse to their swooping.
Rather than gliding passively like paper airplanes,  the rodents actively manipulate the furry membrane that stretches between their wrists and ankles to control the speed and direction of their flight, new research published online today in the Journal of the Royal Society Interface reveals.
The scientists set up video cameras in a Maine forest and analyzed recordings of animals lured to a feeder, and then compared the squirrels’ glide-path trajectories with aerodynamic simulations. Rather than cruising through the air at a constant speed, the team found that the squirrels continuously modulate their speed and direction to attain distance and lift…
(read more: Science NOW)                  (photo from National Geo, 1979)

rhamphotheca:

Flying Squirrels Style They Swoops

by Emily Underwood

Flying squirrels look reckless as they fling themselves through the air, but there’s finesse to their swooping.

Rather than gliding passively like paper airplanes, the rodents actively manipulate the furry membrane that stretches between their wrists and ankles to control the speed and direction of their flight, new research published online today in the Journal of the Royal Society Interface reveals.

The scientists set up video cameras in a Maine forest and analyzed recordings of animals lured to a feeder, and then compared the squirrels’ glide-path trajectories with aerodynamic simulations. Rather than cruising through the air at a constant speed, the team found that the squirrels continuously modulate their speed and direction to attain distance and lift…

(read more: Science NOW)                  (photo from National Geo, 1979)

breathtakingdestinations:

Petra, Jordan (by wallacefsk)
llbwwb:

(via 500px / The King’s Face by Xenedis)